The Machine Man and Learning Robots…

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Robots test their own World Wide Web, dubbed RoboEarth:

A world wide web for robots to learn from each other and share information is being shown off for the first time.

“At its core RoboEarth is a world wide web for robots: a giant network and database repository where robots can share information and learn from each other,” said Rene van de Molengraft, the RoboEarth project leader.

The four robots selected to test the system in a public demonstration will “work collaboratively” to help patients, he told the BBC.

One robot will upload a map of the room so that others can find their way around it, others will attempt to serve drinks to patients.

“The problem right now is that robots are often developed specifically for one task,” he said.

“Everyday changes that happen all the time in our environment make all the programmed actions unusable.”

The aim of the system is to create a kind of ever-changing common brain for robots. [source]

Device implants will push the boundaries of what it mans to be human:

It’s likely the world in the not-so-distant future will be increasingly populated by computerised people like Amal Graafstra.

The 37-year-old doesn’t need a key or password to get into his car, home or computer. He’s programmed them to unlock at the mere wave of his hands, which are implanted with radio frequency identification tags.

The rice-size gadgets work so well, he says, he’s sold similar ones to more than 500 customers through his company Dangerous Things.

Smart ink: A model wears a health-monitoring smart tattoo being developed by MC10 which is designed to transmit information about the wearer's vital signs to smart phones or other devices.

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Smart ink: A model wears a health-monitoring smart tattoo being developed by MC10 which is designed to transmit information about the wearer’s vital signs to smart phones or other devices.

The move to outfit people with electronic devices that can be swallowed, implanted in their bodies or attached to their skin via “smart tattoos” could revolutionise health care and change the way people interact with devices and one another. [source]

Singularity: The robots are coming to steal our jobs:

“AI’s are embedded in the fabric of our everyday lives,” head of AI at Singularity University, Neil Jacobstein, told the BBC.

“They are used in medicine, in law, in design and throughout automotive industry.”

And each day the algorithms that power away, making decisions behind the scenes, are getting smarter.

It means that one of the biggest quests of the modern world – the search to make machines as intelligent as humans – could be getting tantalisingly close. [source]

 

 

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