Apostasia – falling away from faith, or to be taken away?

 

 

The Rapture

UPDATE: I want to amend an error in this post where I said “Apostasia is derived from the word aphistemi, which is where we get the medical term episiotomy from.” This is NOT the case, I had read it wrong. The Greek words sound similar, that’s all. Please read the comments as it is an interesting study on the word Apostasia which comes from the noun apshistemi. Thank you for your understanding. 😀

Preparing for this weeks study, 2 Thessalonians. When you read the Greek and understand where certain words derive from it gives you a better insight. Interesting. Also, I wonder how my Pastor will deal with the revealing before the parousia?

It all depends on how apostasia is translated. It could mean, falling away, or could could mean to be taken away to be cut away from. Separating, divorce from, depart from, to withdraw and be removed.

Popular readings say it is a falling away from the faith. Others say this could mean the rapture itself, as in… to be cut away from this earth and snatched, to be taken away in the parousia. Being snatched and cut away is what happened to Lot when the angel grabbed Lot before the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah. He was taken just in the nick of time. Apostasia is derived from the word aphistemi, which is where we get the medical term episiotomy from.

Interesting to say the least!

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16 thoughts on “Apostasia – falling away from faith, or to be taken away?

  1. I would say that it seems the more probable to translate it falling away. Although sometimes the verb aphistemi can mean to depart or to leave some place or to leave something alone (I couldn’t find an example of it meaning to be removed and if it did mean that it would probably be phrased to be persuaded to leave or caused to leave) the nouns in masculine or feminine forms means defection. Apostasia is only used in 2 thes and in Acts 21:21 to speak of Paul supposedly teaching defection from Moses. The Masculine form is used to speak of divorce in Matt 5:31; 19:7 and Mark 10:4. Also contextually Paul is giving two signs that have to happen before the day of the Lord comes. Why would Paul be giving them 2 signs when they won’t be aware of them happening until they meet the Lord in the air. It makes no sense. He should just say, guys you know you will not be hear to see these things. But Paul gives them 2 signs presumably that they could recognise and know that until these things have happened the day of the Lord could in no wise have taken place. And therefore I would be inclined to believe that Paul sums up the two aspects of Jesus’ coming and our gathering together to Him with the following phrase of the day of the Lord. I would personally take it to mean that once Jesus has started His parousia and we are gathered to him the Day of the Lord has started but those events, that day, cannot happen until there is the apostasia and the man of lawlessness being revealed. Thus I think the argument for it meaning a withdrawing is weak and does not make sense contextually within the epistle.

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  2. Was just looking up the etymology to episiotomy, did not know what it meant. Lol. But struggling to find its relationship to aphistemi. I saw it comes from two words, epision meaning a public region, and tomy meaning a cutting. Which source were you using? Would be interested in knowing if there is a linkage between the idea of cutting and defection.

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    • The strongs concordance says that it is derived from aphistemi. The number is, 646 meaning apostasia it is the verb from the noun aphistemi … Number 868. Meaning to draw away, depart to separate and to remove. The medical word for episiotomy comes from this word. I’m just throwing this out there, you understand.

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      • Thanks. Yes I saw that and know you are not advocating that. Have you seen “The.analytical Greek Lexicon” by Bagster publishers? It doesn,t have an author but really helpful in knowing which meaning fits which context.

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      • 868:
        depart, fall away, refrain, withdraw self.

        From apo and histemi; to remove, i.e. (actively) instigate to revolt; usually (reflexively) to desist, desert, etc. — depart, draw (fall) away, refrain, withdraw self.

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  3. 646 apostasía (from 868 /aphístēmi, “leave, depart,” which is derived from 575 /apó, “away from” and 2476 /histémi, “stand”) – properly, departure (implying desertion); apostasy – literally, “a leaving, from a previous standing.”

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    • Yes it does sound similar. They have different prepositions which don’t come out so clearly in the English. Hope you have a conversation. I value the pre-trib emphasis on readiness for Christ’s return at any time though I am not pre-trib. I also value the post-trib emphasis on readiness for persecution even right up to the end and being willing to suffer. I think if we held both emphases together we can live with the different views of timing in the church. Could you update us as to how your conversation goes with him?

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      • It’s all about balance. Certainly not a salvation issue, definitely a secondary one. I have just had a phone call, and Bible study isn’t on this Friday. It will probably take a few weeks to get to that part of the book anyway. We usually get through about four or five verses in an hour, it’s a very long process, but one that I enjoy. So when we get to that part, I will be taking down notes if he says anything that has piqued my interest.

        In Christ

        vee

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  4. No. I have it as a hardback book but you could probably get one cheap secondhand. When I did my language modules I really saw that context determines the meaning of the word in the passage. For example the word day in Hebrew can mean a longer period of time than 24 hours but the context does not allow for that. However by using Midrash we can pull out a greater significance of truths the passage can illuminate but when it comes to the actual grammatical message the passage conveys context determines which meaning the word takes out of the whole range.

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    • Yes, it’s all about context! That is why I wanted to arm myself before I go into study with this on Friday. My pastors a pre-tribber. I wanted to know how he may see the word apostasy, and from any angle. 😀

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